Shared Ancestry: Cloutier Saturday, Jun 9 2012 

Zacharie Cloutier & Sainte Dupont
Shared Ancestry with Madonna

Beginning with Zacharie Cloutier & Sainte Dupont who emigrated from France to Quebec, we share 2 known generations with Madonna before this line splits off

I.) ZACHARIE CLOUTIER & SAINTE DUPONT
II.) ZACHARIE CLOUTIER & MADELEINE EMARD

MADONNA’S FAMILY

Cloutier, Zacharie (1590-1677)
Dupont, Sainte (1595-1680)
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Cloutier, Zacharie (1617-1708)
Emard, Madeleine (1626-1708)
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Cloutier, Rene (1651- )
Leblanc, Marie Elisabeth (1658-1727)
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Fortin, Eustache (1658-1736)
Cloutier, Louise (1676- )
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Fortin, Louis (1711-1788)
Blanchet, Marie Francoise (1709-1753)
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Fortin, Francois (1746-1780)
Dandurand, Marie Louise (1744- )
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Fortin, Joseph (1774- )
Fortin, Genevieve (1780- )
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Fortin, Francois (1810-1855)
Blier, Marie Victoire (1814-1865)
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Fortin, Henri Nazaire
Daniel, Emilie (1845-1906)
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Fortin, Guillaume Henri (1867-1939)
Demers Marie-Louise (1875-1929)
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Fortin, Willard (1903-1959)
Fortin, Elsie Mae (1911-2011)
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Ciccone, Silvio Anthony (1931- )
Fortin, Madonna Louise (1932-1963)
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MADONNA

OUR FAMILY

Cloutier, Zacharie (1590-1677)
Dupont, Sainte (1595-1680)
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Cloutier, Zacharie (1617-1708)
Emard, Madeleine (1626-1708)
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Gravel, Jean (1654-1699)
Cloutier, Marie (1659- )
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Boucher, Jean (1679-1758)
Gravel, Marie Madeleine (1686-1724)
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Bilodeau, Jean Baptiste (1717-1794)
Boucher, Marie Josephe (1722-1797)
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Bilodeau, Jean Baptiste (1743- )
Boulet, Marie Christine (1756-1842)
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Bilodeau, Pierre (1784-1829)
Blais, Marie Anne (1786-1853)
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Bilodeau, Jerome (1825-1880)
Boissoneau, Olive (1836-1870)
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Bilodeau, Jerome (1859- )
Boutin, Rosalie (1854-1888)
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Bilodeau, Amedee (1884-1966)
Taylor, Bertha (1884-1918)
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Bilodeau, Frank (1912-1996)
Corwin, Laura (1915-1995)
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LIVING

Zacharie Cloutier & Sainte Dupont
Other People That Share This Ancestor

  • Camilla, Dutchess of Cornwall – through son Zacharie
  • Celine Dion – through both son Charles & son Jean
  • Angelina Jolie – through both son Charles & daughter Marie Louise
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Zacharie Cloutier (1590-1677) Friday, Jun 8 2012 

Zacharie Cloutier was born about 1590 in Mortagne-au-Perche (St-Jean), Orne, France. He was the son of Denis and Renee Briere. On 18 July 1616, Zacharie married Sainte Dupont, widow of Michel Lermusier, at St-Jean in Mortagne-au-Perche. The couple welcomed their first child, a son also named Zacharie (our direct ancestor), in 1617 and he was baptised on 16 August at St-Jean.

Zacharie Cloutier 1617 baptism, St-Jean, Mortagne-au-Perche, France

Zacharie and Sainte all together had six children while living in Mortagne-au-Perche, but little Sainte died in 1632 at age 9. The other 5 children successfully made the journey with their parents to New France, having left in early April of 1634 and arrived in Quebec on 4 June –

  • Zacharie, b. 16 Aug 1617
  • Jean, b. 13 May 1620
  • Sainte, b. 01 Nov 1622 – d. 19 Sep 1632
  • Anne, b. 19 Jan 1626
  • Charles, b. 03 May 1629
  • Louise, b. 18 Mar 1632

Zacharie Cloutier family sheet PRDH

The biography of Zacharie Cloutier found in “Our French Canadian Ancestors” by Thomas J. Laforest offers us a detailed version of his life in New France –

IN NEW FRANCE FROM 1634

On January 15, 1634, Surgeon Robert Giffard, a notable proponent of a Canadian community, was soliciting potential emigrants when he received notice that he had been awarded the Seigneurie of Beauport from the One Hundred Associates. Giffard had been in New France before, from 1621 to 1626 and again in 1628. In 1634, he successfully recruited several citizens of Perche as prospective residents for his newly acquired realm, one of which was Zacharie Cloutier.

This contract of servitude signed by Cloutier and Jean Guyon in joinder, in favor of Giffard, was written up by Notary Mathurin Roussel at La Rochelle, on March 14, 1634. It stipulated that Giffard would pay the passage plus food and lodging in Canada (to the extent that the land permitted) for Cloutier and Guyon, plus one family member each, for a period ot three years, to date from June 24, 1634. After two years, the two men would be allowed to send for the rest of their families, also at the expense of the Seigneur of Beauport. Giffard agreed to give each man a few head of livestock to get started farming plus one thousand arpents of land with the right to build on it in addition to the right to hunt, fish and trade with the savages. And so it was done. According to Raoul Cloutier, author of a voluminous essay on his ancestors, even though Zacharie had agreed to leave France with his seventeen year old son only, he changed his mind and decided to bring the entire family to Canada. By July 22, 1634, master-carpenter Zacharie Cloutier and master-mason Jean Guyon were hard at work on construction of a manor house for their lord as well as the parish church and Fort Saint-Louis in Québec.

FIRST MARRIAGE CONTRACT IN CANADA

As soon as the Cloutier family was settled down, Zacharie did not waste any time getting organized. He had already begun to plan for the future of his children and on July 27, 1636, he arranged for his daughter, Anne, to take a husband. This was unusual for two reasons: The marriage contract with Robert Drouin, son of Robert and Marie Dubois, was the first of its kind in Canada and Anne was only ten and a half years old! A stipulation in the agreement provided that, Anne was to continue to live at home with her parents until she was thirteen. The religious ceremony took place when Anne was eleven but, Robert had to contend himself with non-conjugal visits for two more years.

THE FIEF ON THE RIVER BUISSON

A ruling drawn up by Jean de Lespinasse on February 3, 1637 reveals that Jean Guyon and Zacharie Cloutier, who seem to have done nothing without the other, finally took possession of the fiefs promised to them by Giffard. That of Guyon was named “du Buisson “and that of Cloutier was called “La Cloutièrie “. It is in this act that we first observe the signature of Zacharie Cloutier in the form of an axe, the mark of his trade. In 1641, a map made by the engineer-surveyor Jean Bourdon shows the layout of these lands “from Kebec to Cap Tourmente “. We may note that the sons of Zacharie as well as other colonists were settled on the territory extending from the river at Petit Pre to the river at Chiens, which became the future parish of Château-Richer. On May 29, 1644, Notary Guillaume Tronquet recorded that: “Giffard, Sieur de Beauport visited the Buisson river in company with Jean Guyon, Zacharie Cloutier, Adrien du Chesne, Jean Bourdon and Abraham Martin” and that he gave them the land “from this river up to the first point, running along the length of the Saint Lawrence river.”

DISPUTES BETWEEN GIFFARD AND HIS VASSALS

Historian Marcel Trudel reports that, things did not always go well between Seigneur Giffard and his habitants. On December 18, 1636, the Lord of Beauport obtained a judgement against Cloutier and Guyon concerning certain work which was due him. Then, after the division of the land, on December 10, 1637 certain boundaries disputes occured. Governor Montmagny delayed making his decision until May 4, 1642. On July 2, 1646, Giffard sued Guyon and Cloutier for refusing to render him ” faith and homage ” as all good vassals (humble servant or subordinate ) were required to do with regard to their seigneur. On the 19th of the same month, the Governor ordered them to comply. The two disobedients got even in their own way by refusing to present the inventory as required from all landowners in a seigneurie. On August 20, the Governor compelled the rebels to comply once and for all. It is necessary to understand them. They had always considered Giffard as an equal. Their pride having blinded them, they found it difficult to accept their former friend as their superior in the hierarchy.

BOURGEOIS SEIGNEUR AND MASTER CARPENTER

In 1651, the Cloutier family lived on Côte de la Montagne in the town of Québec. Twelve years later, Zacharie was described as a bourgeois seigneur working as a master-carpenter. In addition to his fief of 693 arpents, he owned a lot measuring 41.4 toises ( fathom/6feet ). By this time, he was 73 years old and his wife was 67. He also owned a lot in the lower town of Québec between those of Paschal Lemaistre and Jean Guyon. The census of 1666 indicates that both Zacharies, father and son, lived on the Beaupre coast. Then, the next census, that of 1681, fails to mention either the venerable pioneer or his wife. What became of them?

In order to return to this land at Château-Richer, Zacharie sold his fief to Nicolas Dupont of Neuville on December 20, 1670. Prior to this however, on January 19, 1668, Zacharie assembled his children before Notary Michel Fillon and prepared an agreement designed to minimize the difficulties which could arise from the inheritance after his and Sainte’s deaths. Once all had been settled, the children promised to assist their parents and to attend to all of their needs. The following year, on May 12, 1669, Zacharie and Sainte made their will and placed themselves in the hands of son Zacharie.

Old patriarch Zacharie died first at about 87 years of age. He fell into his last sleep, on November 17, 1677. Sainte was taken in her turn less than three years later, on July 14, 1680. They both lie at rest in their favorite place, Château-Richer.

Zacharie Cloutier’s mark

Cloutier, Zacharie (1590-1677)
Dupont, Sainte (1595-1680)
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Cloutier, Zacharie (1617-1708)
Emard, Madeleine (1626-1708)
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Gravel, Jean (1654-1699)
Cloutier, Marie (1659- )
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Boucher, Jean (1679-1758)
Gravel, Marie Madeleine (1686-1724)
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Bilodeau, Jean Baptiste (1717-1794)
Boucher, Marie Josephe (1722-1797)
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Bilodeau, Jean Baptiste (1743- )
Boulet, Marie Christine (1756-1842)
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Bilodeau, Pierre (1784-1829)
Blais, Marie Anne (1786-1853)
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Bilodeau, Jerome (1825-1880)
Boissoneau, Olive (1836-1870)
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Bilodeau, Jerome (1859- )
Boutin, Rosalie (1854-1888)
|
Bilodeau, Amedee (1884-1966)
Taylor, Bertha (1884-1918)
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Bilodeau, Frank (1912-1996)
Corwin, Laura (1915-1995)
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LIVING

Shared Ancestry: Gagnon Friday, Jun 8 2012 

Pierre Gagnon & Renee Rogers
Shared Ancestry with Madonna

Beginning with Pierre Gagnon & Renee Rogers of France, we share 3 known generations with Madonna before this line splits off

I.) PIERRE GAGNON & RENEE ROGERS
II.) ELOI TAVERNIER & MARGUERITE GAGNON
III.) JOSEPH MASSE GRAVEL & MARGUERITE TAVERNIER

MADONNA’S FAMILY

Gagnon, Pierre
Rogers, Renee
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Tavernier, Eloi (1596- )
Gagnon, Marguerite (1598-1677)
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Gravel, Joseph Masse (1614-1686)
Tavernier, Marguerite (1626-1697)
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Cote Mathieu (-)
Gravel, Elisabeth (1651-1707)
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Cote, Martin (1673-1727)
Ferland, Marguerite (1681-1747)
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Cote, Jean Baptiste (1700-1760)
Bouffard, Marie Louise (1714-1766)
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Coulombe, Ambroise (1758- )
Cote, Marie Josephe (1756- )
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Coulombe, Laurent (1805-1850)
Guay, Marguerite (1805- )
|
Lajoie, Charles (1829-1899)
Coulombe, Rose Alice (1833-1880)
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Fortin, Narcisse (1860-1903)
Lajoie, Rose (1869- )
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Fortin, Willard (1903-1959)
Fortin, Elsie Mae (1911-2011)
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Ciccone, Silvio Anthony (1931- )
Fortin, Madonna Louise (1932-1963)
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MADONNA

OUR FAMILY

Gagnon, Pierre
Rogers, Renee
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Tavernier, Eloi (1596- )
Gagnon, Marguerite (1598-1677)
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Gravel, Joseph Masse (1614-1686)
Tavernier, Marguerite (1626-1697)
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Gravel, Jean (1654-1699)
Cloutier, Marie (1659- )
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Boucher, Jean (1679-1758)
Gravel, Marie Madeline (1686-1724)
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Bilodeau, Jean Baptiste (1717-1794)
Boucher, Marie Josephe (1722-1797)
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Bilodeau, Jean Baptiste (1743)
Boulet, Marie Christine (1756-1842)
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Bilodeau, Pierre (1784-1829)
Blais, Marie Anne (1786-1853)
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Bilodeau, Jerome (1825-1880)
Boissoneau, Olive (1836-1870)
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Bilodeau, Jerome (1859- )
Boutin, Rosalie (1854-1888)
|
Bilodeau, Amedee (1884-1966)
Taylor, Bertha (1884-1918)
|
Bilodeau, Frank (1912-1996)
Corwin, Laura (1915-1995)
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LIVING

Pierre Gagnon & Renee Rogers
Other People That Share This Ancestor

  • Hillary Rodham Clinton – through son Pierre

Marguerite Gagnon (1598-1677) Thursday, Jun 7 2012 

Marguerite Gagnon was baptised on 5 Oct 1598 at St-Aubin in Tourouvre, Mortagne-au-Perche, Orne, France. Baptisms for five younger brothers were also found in St-Aubin, Tourouvre & Ste-Madeleine, La Ventrouze between the years 1601 to 1612.

St-Aubin, Tourouvre, France

Marguerite Gagnon baptism 1598, St-Aubin in Tourouvre, France

Through Fichier Origine, it is learned that Marguerite’s parents were Pierre and Renee Roger (although her mother’s name appears to be written as Francoise in her baptism, one can assume it is more accurately written as Renee among other family records Fichier Origine — an extremely reliable genealogical source — has witnessed).  Her father’s parents were Pierre Gagnon and Francoise Creste.

On 3 February 1624, Marguerite married Eloi Tavernier at Ste-Madeleine in La Ventrouze, Mortagne-au-Perche, Orne, France.

Ste-Madeleine, La Ventrouze, France

Eloi Tavernier was born about 1596 in Randonnai (St-Malo), Mortagne-au-Perche, Orne, France. His parents were Thomas and Julienne Jouy. Eloi and Marguerite Gagnon had two daughters in Randonnai (St-Malo); Marguerite (our direct ancestor) in about 1626 and Marie, baptised 27 May 1631 at St-Malo.

St-Malo, Randonnai, France

The Tavernier family seems to have taken the journey from France to Quebec in about 1642, perhaps settling on the coast of Beaupre where Marguerite Gagnon’s brothers are shown living in 1641. No burial record has ever been found for Eloi, but it appears he died sometime after 19 April 1651 when last mention of him is noted in the baptism record of the first twins born in New France, Marguerite & Elisabeth, daughters of Joseph Masse Gravel and Marguerite Tavernier.

Marguerite Gravel (twin to Elisabeth) baptism sheet PRDH, 1651

By the 1666 census, Marguerite is living with her daughter Marie in Comté de Montmorency, along with Marie’s two children, Eustache Bascon (age 15) and Marie Bascon (age 13). Both Marguerite and her daughter Marie are listed as widowed.

The 1667 census shows Marguerite, age 68, still living in Comté de Montmorency, now with grandson Eustache Bacon (age 17) and domestique Jean Cousture (age 17).

Marguerite Gagnon died 7 December 1677 and was buried the next day at Chateau Richer.

Marguerite had three younger brothers that went to Quebec early on; Mathurin (b. 22 Oct 1606, St-Aubin, Tourouvre), Jean (b. 13 Aug 1610, St-Aubin, Tourouvre), and Pierre (b. 14 Feb 1612, Ste-Madeleine, La Ventrouze).

St-Aubin, Tourouvre, France – Names & baptisms of emigrants to New France

In 1635, the three brothers opened a shop in Quebec City, 60 by 24 feet, on the Rue Saint-Pierre in the lower town. Their business partner was Joseph Masse Gravel who married Marguerite Tavernier, thier niece (daughter of older sister, Marguerite Gagnon).

Much has been written about Marguerite’s three younger brothers in the early settlement of Quebec, as they carried on the family name and today have thousands of Gagnon decendents between them.

Gagnon, Pierre
Rogers, Renee
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Tavernier, Eloi (1596- )
Gagnon, Marguerite (1598-1677)
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Gravel, Joseph Masse (1614-1686)
Tavernier, Marguerite (1626-1697)
|
Gravel, Jean (1654-1699)
Cloutier, Marie (1659- )
|
Boucher, Jean (1679-1758)
Gravel, Marie Madeline (1686-1724)
|
Bilodeau, Jean Baptiste (1717-1794)
Boucher, Marie Josephe (1722-1797)
|
Bilodeau, Jean Baptiste (1743- )
Boulet, Marie Christine (1756-1842)
|
Bilodeau, Pierre (1784-1829)
Blais, Marie Anne (1786-1853)
|
Bilodeau, Jerome (1825-1880)
Boissoneau, Olive (1836-1870)
|
Bilodeau, Jerome (1859- )
Boutin, Rosalie (1854-1888)
|
Bilodeau, Amedee (1884-1966)
Taylor, Bertha (1884-1918)
|
Bilodeau, Frank (1912-1996)
Corwin, Laura (1915-1995)
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LIVING

Ancient Provinces of France Thursday, Jun 7 2012 

Ancient Provinces of France

The following information which explains the relationships between the ancient parishes and provinces to the current communes and départements in France was provided by Monsieur Pierre Le Clercq, vice-chairman of the Société généalogique de l’Yonne –

He wrote, “When you read old French documents nowadays, dating back from 1792 and before, you discover a totally different system of situating places on the map. Before 1793, there was no départements and no régions, and Joigny was not a town situated in the French département of Yonne, within the French région of Bourgogne (or Burgundy in English). Everything is simple now, but things were very complicated then. The smallest administrative units were the parishes on a religious level, and the seigneuries on both fiscal and judiciary levels.

In 1790, the French revolutionaries, who were still monarchists then, decided to choose the existing 32,000 French parishes as the only basic administrative units, with the very same limits as before, and to abolish seigneuries. In order to simplify the whole architecture of larger units, such as French provinces used on a military level, French élections and généralités on a fiscal level, and French bailliages and parlements on a judiciary level, the French revolutionaries decided to merge all those different larger units into only one, called départements with about the same geographic area. At the end of 1792, a new wave of French revolutionaries, who were now republicans, decided to create a new type of basic administrative unit, called communes, with the very same limits as the old parishes. The only difference was that major cities including several parishes, like the town of Joigny and its three parishes of Saint-André, Saint-Jean and Saint-Thibault, formed one single commune.

Since 1793, the French population has been living under the administrative system created by the French revolutionaries of 1790 and 1792. Nowadays, our basic unit is the commune, with the same limits as the old parishes (apart from major cities), and our major greater unit is the département. Some new units have been created later, like the cantons and arrondissements between the communes and the départements, and the régions above the départements, but most French people only use the communes and the départements nowadays to localize precisely the places where they live. If they use a word like Bourgogne or Bretagne, we are never sure whether they mean the old province or the new région, the limits of the two systems being often quite different. This is why I would advise you to concentrate on the nowaday communes and départements, which are in fact the two basic kernels of our administrative and geographical units. The Mormons in Salt Lake City localize all the French places with this system only, writing Joigny, Yonne, France.

In my last electronic letter, I wrote that one could alter this basic system by adding the nowadays French régions, which are big enough to be compared with the huge American states, Canadian provinces and German lands. This is why one could localize a town like Joigny in the following way : Joigny, Yonne, Bourgogne, France.

This last system would be sufficient if we only read modern documents. But a genealogist reads old documents, mostly church books in which names of parishes and dioceses are mentioned. Knowing that some major communes like Joigny used to include several parishes, a good genealogist cannot ignore those parishes, because they are the basic units where researchers must look for the proper church books in order to get the genealogical pieces of information they need. This is why I personally add a fifth column in order to mention the name of the parish or any smaller unit than the commune (for instance the names of hospitals). For instance, your ancestor Antoine Roy was baptized in Saint-Jean, Joigny, Yonne, Bourgogne, France. If I do not know the name of the church, I always put a comma in front of the name of the commune, in order to put the commune in the right column. For instance, someone who was born in Joigny after 1792, when church registration had been replaced by civil registration in France, would appear in any of my PAF databases as being born in , Joigny, Yonne, Bourgogne, France (with a comma before Joigny).”

source: royandboucher.com

Joseph Masse Gravel dit Brindeliere (1614-1686) Wednesday, Jun 6 2012 

Joseph Masse Gravel/Gravelle dit Brindeliere’s place of origin in France has been questioned over the years. It was documented as Normandy when he received confirmation along with 174 other adults at Chateau-Richer on 2 Feb 1660. Then it was thought Joseph had lived in the diocese of Sees in Normandy. Tanguay noted that he was born in 1616 in Tourouvre, Mortagne-au-Perche, Orne. PRDH believes he was born about 1614 in the medieval town of  Dinan in the department of Cotes-d’Armor.

Joseph Gravel individual sheet PRDH

Joseph’s parents are believed to have been Joseph Gravel and Marguerite Macé of Illiers-Combray in the department of Eure-et-Loir. This could be why the additional name of Masse was used by Joseph (as a given name).

When Joseph arrived in New France is uncertain, however the map of the Beaupre Coast in 1641, crafted by engineer Jean Bourdon, indicates the presence of Gravel in that territory.

Map from 1641 of the coast of Beaupre

On 1 May 1644, Joseph married Marguerite Tavernier in the chapel of Notre-Dame-des-Anges. According to Fichier Origine, Marguerite was born about 1626 in Randonnai (St-Malo), Mortagne-au-Perche, Orne. Marguerite was the daughter of Eloi Tavernier and Marguerite Gagnon. Her mother was the sister of the Gagnon brothers – Mathurin, Jean & Pierre – all of whom came to Quebec and can be seen living on the Beaupre Coast in 1641.

Joseph Gravel and Marguerite Tavernier marriage 1644

Joseph and Marguerite had 12 children together, including the first set of twins born in the New France settlement, Marguerite and Elisabeth, baptised 19 Apr 1651. Some researchers believe another set of twins was born to them, sons Joseph and Claude. PRDH disputes this however, claiming Joseph was born before 1660 while Claude was born 20 Feb 1662 at Chateau Richer. Whatever the case, we are descendents through their 6th child, son Jean (and as a fun sidenote, Madonna is a descendent through their twin daughter, Elisabeth).

Joseph Gravel family sheet PRDH

Jean Gravel was born 13 Feb 1654 and went on to marry Marie Cloutier. His brother Pierre married her sister, Marie Madeleine, 8 years before. Both were daughters of Zacharie Cloutier and Marie Madeleine Emard.

Four of the Gravel children never married. Alexis (male), born 25 March 1649 and lived to be 65, never married, which was highly unusual for this time period. However, the other three childen, all girls, grew up to become Ursuline nuns; Marie Madeleine, Francoise, and Genevieve.

Joseph died 26 April 1686 and was buried at Chateau Richer on 28 April. Marguerite died 12 January 1697 and was buried the next day at Chateau Richer.

Joseph Gravel sepulture 1686

The following biography is from “Our French-Canadian Ancestors” by Thomas J. Laforest. While it contains some discrepancies, overall it is a wonderful and historic source about our ancestor, Joseph Gravel.

JOSEPH-MACE GRAVEL DIT BRINDELLIERE

This double first name results from a combination of inheritance, Joseph from his father and Mace from his mother, Marguerite Mace. According to Father Pierre Gravel, Joseph and Marguerite were from Illiers, capital of the Department of Eure-et-Loire in the Diocese of Chartres. Ancestor Gravel was born about 1616. According to some he first saw the light of day on the left bank of the river Rance, parish of Saint-Sauveur, town of Dinan, in Brittany. This is undocumented hearsay, without factual proof. But there is ample reason to believe that Joseph-Mace Gravel, or even Masse-Joseph Gravelle as he was sometimes known, had lived in the Diocese of Seez, in Normandy. Not far from this region, at Mortagne in Perche, the genealogist Archange Godbout, found a parish entry dated 9 September 1625, naming one Anne Gravelle, godmother to Nicolas Boucher, son of Gaspard. Jean Lefort, living in Canada at this same time and in the same region as Joseph-Mace, had a mother named Perrine Gravelle, who was the daughter of Denis Gravelle from Torouvre in Perche.

The founders of Ville-Marie arrived in Quebec in August of 1641. The temptation is strong among those who like reflected fame, to slide ancestor Gravel in with this eminent group. However, the reality is quite different. A map of the Beaupre coast drawn by cartographer Jean Bourdon in 1641 already shows the presence of Gravel in New France. Like Robert Drouin, Francois Belanger, and many others, Joseph-Mace Gravel had come with the encouragement of Giffard.

FOUNDING HIS HOME

After several years of getting used to his new surroundings, J.-Mace Gravel dit Brindelierre or Brindilliere, a sobriquet probably given him because of his small stature, married Marguerite Tavernier on 1 May 1644. His bride, born about 1627 at Sainte-Madeleine de la Ventrouze, Randonnay, Perche, was the first daughter of Eloi Tavernier and Marguerite Gagnon, niece of the tree Gagnon brothers. Father Georges d’Endemare, S. J., missionary from Sainte-Anne du Cap-Breton, blessed their union in the chapel of Beauport. Witnesses present were Messieurs Legardeur de Repentigny, Noel Juchereau des Chatelets and Mathurin Gagnon, uncle of the bride.

At that time, did the couple settle on the Beaupre Coast, about a mile to the west of today’s church of Chateau-Richer? Mace must have had time enough to build himself a good cabin on his land of 6 arpents in frontage by 126 in depth, to which he obtained official title on 19 May 1650 from Olivier Letardif. We do know for certain that their first living child Pierre, was baptized at Chateau-Richer by Father Jean Le Sueur “in the house of Masse Gravel” on 9 February 1647. Godfather Pierre Gagnon gave his name to his godson, as was the custom. His aunt Marie Tavernier was the godmother.

In a contract before notary Lecoustre, on 8 September 1647, Gravel, a citizen living “at the long pointe,” that is to say, to the west of Chateau-Richer, admitted owing 100 livres to Pierre Legardeur, for the sale of delivery of some grain.

Madame Gravel, on 15 December 1648, acted as godmother to Jean Toupin, the future sieur de Belair, at Sault-a-la-Pace, not far from Sainte-Anne.

WITH THE GAGNONS

Ancestor Gravel, an honest and active man, knew how to cultivate his farm in a masterly fashion, all the while searching elsewhere for supplementary income. According to the census of 1667, J.-M. Gravel owned 52 arpents of cleared land and had 36 heard of cattle in his stable. At that time, this represented real prosperity.

From early on, Gravel was associated with the Gagnons who were brewers. So, on 6 October 1653, we find him with them as co-owners of a shop and residence in the port area of Quebec. This property measured 80 feet in length and had been granted by Messieur d’Aillebout on 14 August 1651. This place was rented to Jean Garos for 90 livres. He was a merchant from La Rochelle temporarily in Quebec for six months. On 8 November 1661, Gravel sold his share of the house which “consists of one bedroom, loft and cellar,” for the sum of 600 livres to be paid in three installments, by Louis Dupouty, sieur de Saint-Louis. Thomas Touchet had bought this house for the same price, on 7 September of the same year and was to have made his first payment on 29 September. It seems that Touchet did not honor his obligations nor cancel the verbal contract.

THE END OF A DREAM

After more than 46 years of work in New France, at the age of about 70, our ancestor the stonemason, Joseph-Mace Gravel, left his loved ones for his eternal rest. He was buried in the cemetery of Chateau-Richer on 28 April 1686. He had done much for his adopted land. Let us add to what has been already said by quoting the Institute Drouin, which tells us that Monsieur Gravel “contracted for the masonry and carpentry of the Chateau Saint-Louis in Quebec, and of the church of this town.” Mace Gravel also had been church warden of his parish from 1660 to 1663, he was confirmed there along with his sons Pierre and Alexis and his manservant Robert Laberge, on the occasion of the first pastoral visit of Mgr. de Lavel. On 2 February 1669.

Marie Tavernier survived her husband by ten years. Her funeral took place at the Chateau-Richer on 12 January 1697. The following July the distribution of the estate to the three sons and heirs took place.

Gravel, Joseph Masse (1614-1686)
Tavernier, Marguerite (1626-1697)
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Gravel, Jean (1654-1699)
Cloutier, Marie (1659- )
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Boucher, Jean (1679-1758)
Gravel, Marie Madeline (1686-1724)
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Bilodeau, Jean Baptiste (1717-1794)
Boucher, Marie Josephe (1722-1797)
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Bilodeau, Jean Baptiste (1743)
Boulet, Marie Christine (1756-1842)
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Bilodeau, Pierre (1784-1829)
Blais, Marie Anne (1786-1853)
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Bilodeau, Jerome (1825-1880)
Boissoneau, Olive (1836-1870)
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Bilodeau, Jerome (1859- )
Boutin, Rosalie (1854-1888)
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Bilodeau, Amedee (1884-1966)
Taylor, Bertha (1884-1918)
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Bilodeau, Frank (1912-1996)
Corwin, Laura (1915-1995)
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LIVING

Jean Baptiste Bilodeau (1717-1794) pedigree chart Tuesday, Jun 5 2012 

So far the ancestry from Jean Baptiste (1717-1794) and his parents on upward is complete (shaded in blue). Understand, this is just the Bilodeau line so far!

  • Jacques (1634-1712), m. Genevieve Longchamp
  • Jean (1658-1699), m. Marie Jahan Laviolette
  • Gabriel (1690-1728), m. Isabelle Elisabeth LeRoy
  • Jean Baptiste (1717-1794), m. Marie Josephe Boucher
  • Jean Baptiste (1743- ), m. Marie Christine Boulet
  • Pierre (1784- ), m. Marie Anne Blais
  • Jerome (1825- ), m. Olive Boissoneau
  • Jerome (1859- ), m. Rosalie Boutin
  • Amedee (1884-1966), m. Bertha Taylor
  • Frank (1912-1996), m. Laura Corwin 
Jean Baptiste Bilodeau (1717-1794) pedigree chart

When I started in Quebec, I began tracing the Boutin line (Rosalie Boutin, Jerome Bilodeau’s wife) and that is why there are some ancestors in the blog (Noel Langlois, Marguerite Gaulin, Pierre Lefebvre, and Renee Herve’s brother Gabriel‘s story) whom you won’t find on the above chart. You will see them on the Boutin chart once it’s completed!

Next, I’m turning my attention to Marie Josephe Boucher, Jean Baptiste’s wife.

Persons in this chart with a blog posting:

Antoine Casse (1641-1709) Tuesday, Jun 5 2012 

Antoine Casse/LaCasse was baptised 26 Apr 1641 at St-Pierre de Doue-la-Fontaine, Maine-et-Loire, France. His parents were Noel Casse and Michelle Durand.

Antoine Casse baptism, 1641 – Eglise St-Pierre de Doue-la-Fontaine, France

Eglise St-Pierre de Doue-la-Fontaine (St-Pierre church of Doue-la-Fontaine) , with a very plain exterior, is remarkable for its three naves built during diverse epochs.

Eglise St-Pierre de Doue-la-Fontaine, France

It’s unclear exactly when Antoine Casse left France for Quebec, but by 14 Oct 1665, he marries Francoise Pilois DePitie, a fille du roi from Paris, at Chateau-Richer.

Antoine Casse and Francoise DePitie marriage record (copy detail) 1665, Chateau-Richer

Francoise Pilois DePitie was from St-Nicolas-des-Champs in Paris, France. She was born about 1639 to parents Francois and Claudine Poulet. Francoise arrived in Quebec on 2 Oct 1665 aboard the ship Le St Jean-Baptiste de Dieppe as a fille du roi. She and Antoine married 12 days later.

St-Nicolas-des-Champs de Paris

By the 1667 census of Quebec, we find Antoine and Francoise living in Comte de Montmorency with a 20-year-old domestic, Etienne Jacob.

Antoine Casse census 1667

The couple went on to have 10 children. We are decendents through their daughter Jeanne Therese (1673-1699) who went on to marry Noel LeRoy.

Antoine Casse family sheet PRDH

The family appears again in the 1681 census, now living in Beaumont.

Antoine Casse census 1681

Over the years, Antoine and his family appear to have moved around quite a bit (more can be read about that in the story that follows). Below is a map that shows the Casse family settlements in early Quebec.

Antoine Casse family settlements, early Quebec

Antoine died at age 68 in Beaumont and was buried 1 June 1709. Francoise soon followed, dying at age 74 in Beaumont (St-Etienne) and was buried 28 February 1713.

Antoine Casse by Jane Goodrich & “Our French Canadian Ancestors” by Thomas Laforest Vol 1. –

Antoine Casse dit Lacasse, was originally from Anjou, a French province serving as the gateway to Brittany, located between Maine and Poitou. He was baptized about 1641 at the Church of St Pierre in Doue, now Doue-la-Fontaine, Maine-et-Loire, District of Saumur. This church, with a very plain exterior, is remarkable for its three naves built during diverse epochs.

On Wednesday, October 14, 1665 at Chateau-Richer, the notary Claude Aubert prepared a contract of marriage between Antoine and his bride to be, Francoise Pitye. She was the daughter of Francois Pitye and Claudine Poullet from the parish of St Nicholas des Champs in Paris. Present at the signing were Romain Trepagner, Surgeon Francois Fortin, and his wife Marie Jolliet, Charles Lefrancois and others. Because of an oversight the contract was not entered into the records until the following March 28th. Nevertheless, the marriage took place the same day the contract was signed, Father Thomas Morel gave the nuptial benediction after having dispensed with the reading of the two banns.

On June 16 1666, Antoine bought some property from Jean Baron, an associate of Mathurin Tessier. This land was three arpents of river frontage located at Saint-Pierre, Ile d’Orleans between Robert Jeanne and Mathurin Chabot. It was formerly the land of ancestor Savard, and the price was 295 livres. Barthelemy Verreau was witness to this transaction. However, on July 13, 1667, Antoine signed it over to the two brothers, Adrien and Michel Isabel, before witnesses.

On December 4, 1666, Antoine broke a lease on a farm, a lease he had made with Antoine Berson, now dead. Berson’s widow, Marguerite Belanger, accepted the cancellation and rreposeded her property in the fief of Lothainville, today’s L’Ange-Gardien. She had to give him 215 livres in compensation and “a grey cloak that the said Casse vowed to have had and received from the master” She allowed him to keep the house and kitchen until next May; also a place in the shed to put ” his part and portion of the grain”. Such compensation leads us to conclude that Antoine must have lived there for several years. The grey cloak- did it belong to the late Berson? Our man seemed to think so, no doubt it was made in France.

David Letourneau, another ancestor, miller of the seigneurie of Beauport, but resident on the Ile d’Orleans, decided to sell his land to Lacasse. According to the deal, concluded on August 15, 1667, David vacated a property located on the south coast of the island, next to that of Jean Letourneau and Jean Grignon, for the sum of 200 livres payable in two installments. The seller kept for himself ” only those parts which are necessary for the grain milling process of said habitation” because they could be useful to his son, Jean. After one year to the day, Jeanne Barilo, his wife, ratified the sale.

On Wednesday, November 2, 1667, Antoine would consent to assign “Jean Prevost of the city of Rouen come this present year to this country” to Jacques Ratte, resident of the island. It seems that Antoine had agreed to take this immigrant for four years. And another matter, on December 5, Roamin Trepagner admitted to owing Antoine 19 livres and 10 sols.

Antoine on March 22, 1669, still lived on the Beaupre coast. In order to pay the sum of 144 livres for merchandise received and delivered, Antoine agreed to pay back his creditor, Bertrand Chesnay, Seigneur of Lothainville, by Saint Michel’s Day. He was to satisfy this debt “in money or in pelts.” Was Antoine a part-time fur trader? The witness to this notorial act was named Jean Casse. Could this have been a relative? Jean Casse was 35 years old in 1667 and a former domestic of Charles Bazire. A Poitevin, he married Magdeleine Plouard, a Breton, on November 22, 1667 at Chateau-Richer. This couple returned to France after which we lose trace of them.

The 24th of the same month, Antoine asked Letourneau to accept 100 planks valued at 45 livres as a deduction from his debt. Robert Anest made these planks from pine wood and they were good and saleable. He had traded them to Lacasse for a fat pig.

Antoine and Francoise settled down on the island toward the end of 1669. It is certain that Lacasse lived on the island on February 14, 1670, because from there he promised to deliver on the wharf at Quebec, with Pierre Dufresne 500 planks to Jean B. Patoullet, for a price of forty livres.

The following April, Claude Charron, wealthy merchant of Quebec, sold a five year old brown cow to Lacasse. The latter had to remit eighteen livres worth of salted butter in good condition for each of three years. If perchance, the poor beast had to give up her life because of the negligence of her adopted father, the latter was to pay half her value. He had to be poor to accept such conditions!

The follow several years of silence. On January 18, 1677, Lacasse sold his land on the south shore of the Island with all that was on it, to Pierre Bissonnet, for 500 livres. Up until the sale, Jean Letourneau and Francois Dumas were his neighbors. For the first time, we discover the well-lettered signature of our ancestor next to that of Nicolas Gauvreau. The contract was made at Quebec by notary Pierre Duquet.

Our ancestor was always attracted to the south shore. From the Beaupre coast he moved to the Island, then into today’s parish of St-Laurent, then on to Beaumont. It was there on July 1, 1678, where Father Thomas Morel baptized his daughter, Charlotte.

In 1672, Charles Couillard had obtained the seigneurie of Beaumont from Talon. According to the census of 1681, Antoine was one of fourteen colonists established on this territory . He owned a gun, three head of cattle, and eight arpents of cleared land. On the Beaupre coast in 1667, he had three beasts, fourteen arpents of worthwhile land and a hired hand: obviously he had not improved his position. Did Antoine get this new bit of land on credit? Perhaps, because we note that he obtained the property of four arpents in Frontage on June 14, 1682, but it was not until 1699 that it was officially conceded to him.

In those times one went to Mass at Point Levy. For special occasions, the manor house of the seigneur served as a chapel. It was there on August 9, 1681, that Monsiegneur de Laval confirmed several people, among whom were the fifteen year old Marie Casse and her twelve year old brother Joseph.

Lacasse owned, in company with Michel Mailloux-de-la-Durantaye, a beautiful boat complete with sails and ground tackle. Francois Frichet bought it on July 18, 1683 for the sum of 129 livres. He acted in the name of Pierre Lereau and Pierre Ducharme.

In 1687 Pierre Bissonett, now a farmer of Durantaye, left the land he had bought from Lacasse, with the half arpent of frontage he had added to it. Two years later on March 13, 1689, Jean Jouanne bought it for 340 livres.

On March 28, 1686 John Adam, in the name of his Seigneur conceded “three arpents of land in width and forty in depth” in order to enlarge the property of Antoine. The latter was not able to clear it, moreover he had to pay the seigneurial rents. Therefore, On June 1, 1699, he decided to abandon his concession.

Antoine and Francoise on August 26, 1702 had come to the end of their rope. “Desiring especially to spend the rest of their days in peace and tranquility, in order to better care for their health”, they made a donation to their son, Charles. This heir became owner of two steers, two cows, one fourteen year old mare with her four month old colt, and half of the coastal land to the northeast. In return the son was expected to feed, clothe, house, and to care for his parents until their deaths and afterward, to have thirty Requiem Masses said for the repose of their souls. At Quebec, the baliff Etienne Maranda signed this donation as witness with notary Chamberlain.

This avalanche of detail should not cause you to forget that the family of Lacasse worked a farm for survival. One feels that in this house there was hope for a better life which was never realized.

Antoine Casse signature

Casse, Antoine (1641-1709)
Pilois DePitie, Francoise (1639-1713)
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LeRoy, Noel (1663-1731)
Casse, Jeanne Therese (1673-1699)
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Bilodeau, Gabriel (1690-1728)
LeRoy, Isabelle Elisabeth (1692-1773)
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Bilodeau, Jean Baptiste (1717-1794)
Boucher, Marie Josephe (1722-1797)
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Bilodeau, Jean Baptiste (1743- )
Boulet, Marie Christine (1756-1842)
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Bilodeau, Pierre (1784-1829)
Blais, Marie Anne (1786-1853)
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Bilodeau, Jerome (1825-1880)
Boissoneau, Olive (1836-1870)
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Bilodeau, Jerome (1859- )
Boutin, Rosalie (1854-1888)
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Bilodeau, Amedee (1884-1966)
Taylor, Bertha (1884-1918)
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Bilodeau, Frank (1912-1996)
Corwin, Laura (1915-1995)
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LIVING

Jeanne Lelievre (1634-1728) Tuesday, Jun 5 2012 

Jeanne Lelievre was baptised 22 Mar 1634 at St-Leonard de Honfleur, Calvados, France. She was the illegitimate child of Guillaume and Judith Riquier.

St-Leonard Church in Honfleur, France

Little is known about Jeanne’s mother, Judith Riquier. As for her father, Guillaume Lelievre, he was born about 1615 in Honfleur (St-Leonard), Calvados, France. His parents were Jacques and Antoinette Bougard. Guillaume went to Quebec sometime after 1656 and was contracted to marry Marguerite Meillet on 21 August 1660.

Guillaume Lelievre and Marguerite Meillet marriage contract, 21 Aug 1660

Marguerite was the recent widow of Pierre Brincoste who was killed by Iroquois on 31 July. Sadly, the union between Guillaume and Marguerite never took place as she and her only surviving child with Pierre, infant daughter Judith, both drowned just 9 days later, on 30 August, on their way from Beauport to Quebec City.

Guillaume is seen in both the 1666 and 1667 census records, then disappears from the records after 09 March 1677. It doesn’t appear that he ever attempted to marry again and his death is unknown.

Guillaume Lelievre census 1667 (grandson Noel – our direct ancestor – is shown also)

In February of 1658, Jeanne Lelievre married Nicholas LeRoy at St-Remy de Dieppe, Seine-Maritime, France. The couple had 2 children in Dieppe before making the voyage from France to Quebec in 1661 where another 8 were born. We are decendants through their third child, son Noel.

Nicholas LeRoy died sometime around 1690. Jeanne remarried on 8 Feb 1695 to Francois Molinet in Beaumont, Bellechasse, Quebec.

Jeanne was buried 11 Jan 1728 in St-Vallier, Bellechasse, Quebec at age 93.

Jeanne Lelievre sepulture, 1728

Understanding Dit names Tuesday, Jun 5 2012 

Found primarily in France, New France, and Scotland, dit names are essentially an alias tacked on to a family name or surname. Dit in French is a form of the word dire, which means “to say,” and in the case of dit names is translated loosely as “that is to say,” or “called.” Therefore, the first name is the family’s original surname, passed down to them by an ancestor, while the “dit” name is the name the person/family is actually called or known as. Dit names are used by families, not specific individuals, and are usually passed down to future generations, either in place of the orginal surname, or in addition to it.

Why a dit name? Dit names were often adopted by families to distinguish them from another branch of the same family. Interestingly, many dit names derived from military service, where early French military rules required a nom de guerre, or nickname, for all regular soldiers. The specific dit name may have been chosen for many of the same reasons as the original surname – as a nickname based on trade or physical characteristics, or to identify the ancestral place of origin.

An example of dit name usage can be seen in the case of ancestor Noel Langlois. He and wife Francoise Grenier had a son, also named Noel. When son Noel was older, he chose to take on a dit name to differentiate himself from his father, going by Noel Langlois dit Traversy (it’s believed he took on this name because he knew Francois de Traversy who was killed by the Iroquois).

It’s also important to note that, when doing family genealogy, as the surname is passed down through the generations, the dit may often be dropped and certain decendents may have taken the original surname as their own or the dit name.

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